What went wrong with on-demand, artisanal food.

With the recent failure of Silicon Valley startup Munchery, and the less-recent failure of Sprig, SF Chronical offers an interesting post-mortem of the on-demand food business model. It’s interesting to read some of the quotes from former Sprig employees about the lack of concern for quality as they scaled. I remember noticing this as a customer in Chicago – food quality went steadily downhill over the course of the first 3 months until I gave up on them. Thankfully I was introduced to Factor 75 shortly after! learn more

How gut bacteria from infants could prevent food allergy.

“Researchers from the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Naples Federico II in Italy discovered that when gut microbes from healthy human infants were transplanted into germ-free mice, the animals were protected from an allergic reaction when exposed to cow’s milk.” The upshot: “These bacteria or their metabolites could be used as part of biotherapeutic drugs to prevent or reverse other common food allergies.” learn more

How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease

Authors: Michael Greger, M.D., Gene Stone

I’m way too busy (or lazy) to verify the quality of the myriad scientific papers and studies referenced throughout this book. I haven’t counted them either, but there are surely hundreds of them. So, instead I’ll just assume that at least half of what I read in this book can be discarded as flimsy. That still leaves the unignorable other half, which is a lot.

My take-away from the book is that a plant-based diet is shown repeatedly in research to improve the quality of human health. In general, I am convinced of this. At the same time, I recognize that there’s an asterisk on much of this because of the challenges inherent in nutrition research.

Personally, since I am a big fan of fruits and veggies, it’s not too hard to make them the bulk of my diet!

If you’re interested in nutrition, I think this book is worth reading. The author definitely unearths some obscure research about different foods and diseases. If you read it and happen to take the time to fact-check his sources, please let me know!

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