on the blockchain

Substack vs. DAOstack.

“Decentralization doesn’t eliminate the hard problems. It doesn’t wish away wars over values; hierarchies of professional vs amateur; the challenges of developing and nurturing talent. And, token-based governance isn’t necessarily going to reach the best or most ethical solutions. But […]

on the blockchain

The future of digital communities.

“Key learnings: Dicker envisions what he calls “Web 3.0,” a world in which social tokens, NFTs (non-fungible tokens), and “creator DAOs” (decentralized autonomous organizations) will create new layers of digital value that will allow audiences to interact with each other, […]

on the blockchain

From winner take all to win and help win.

This is the first article I’ve read that is hosted on the decentralized web and was auctioned as an NFT with the proceeds automatically and transparently shared with authors, contributors, and others. And that’s what it’s about: “Web3 technologies that […]

on the blockchain

The ABCs of DAOs

“As of June 2021, over $1 billion has been committed towards blockchain-native analogs of traditional corporations called decentralized autonomous organizations or DAOs.” | learn more

on the blockchain

The case against Bitcoin

“Peter Thiel’s former portfolio manager says that the crypto narrative is built on half-truths and a nonchalance about the security provided by the nation-state.” | learn more

on the blockchain

Crypto Sci-Hub and the decentralization of science

“Open and publicly accessible research graphs can also have their own network-native crypto incentives. This might create novel funding models for curation, and shift the world of scientific research from a US-government-centered, dollar-funded, institutional model to a decentralized network of […]

on the blockchain

Untraceable Bitcoin is a myth.

Last week’s link mused on exactly how the government recovered some of the Colonial Pipeline ransom. This week, Ezra Galston from Starting Line added additional perspective in the WSJ. “Bitcoin is anonymous, but it’s far from private—an important but often overlooked distinction. […]